Unscrewed

If you have read my last few blogs about my leg (found here and here), you may still be in suspense as to which procedure I had done on Friday, June 26th.

Drum roll please…

I elected to go with just having the one screw by my ankle removed from my body. It was the surgery that seemed like the least invasive, least intensive, and least expensive of the three removal options. It was also the only one that did not require me to be knocked out during the surgery.

Up early and raring to go, I flew over to O’ahu to have the surgery done at the Minimally Invasive Surgery of Hawaii center. I would have liked Emily to fly over with me to be there to support me (and she wanted to be there for me), but interisland airfare just keeps going up, so I was flying solo (literally).

The procedure took no time at all. I was awake the entire time, and it could not have been easier…for me. The hardest part of the entire procedure was leaving the facility.

When I told the recovery staff that my ride was downstairs waiting for me, they asked me if I wanted to ride in the wheelchair down to the lobby. I naively responded that I was okay to walk, to which they responded that it was the center’s policy that I be taken down via the wheelchair.

I suggested that next time they just simply tell me that I have to take the wheelchair out and there wouldn’t have been any hostility or sarcasm from me. Why ask me a question that already had an answer? Clearly I was not given the correct answer ahead of time.

My left foot.
My left foot…post surgery.

Dr. Harpstrite was kind enough to clean off and sterilize the screw after he removed it. I took it home in what looked like a urine sample container.

Two inch screw.
The two inch screw that was in me.
screw
skroo: a short, slender, sharp-pointed metal pin with a raised helical thread running around it and a slotted head, used to join things together by being rotated so that it pierces wood or other material and is held tightly in place.
Quarter inch incision is all that remains.
Quarter inch incision is all that remains.

After two days, per doctor’s orders, I was allowed to remove the bandage and gauze. I am not the least hairy person I know, but as far as I can see, I fall somewhere between a blonde orangutan and slightly less hairy than the late, great Robin Williams. I figured after two days my skin and hair would come off with the bandage, but as I peeled off the bandage, I was pleasantly surprised to find that only a couple dozen hairs came off with the sticky, waterproof dressing.

Hair
Removing the bandage after the two-day waiting period was a hair-raising experience.

Now that I am lighter by one two-inch screw, I am ready to put my best foot forward and face the world…well, maybe not my best foot, but a close second.

Ready to face the world.
All that remains.
Vincent Lorusso Written by:

A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives. - Jackie Robinson

2 Comments

  1. June 30, 2015
    Reply

    I’m glad the procedure went well. What’s your first impression? Is it better than before? Also, you were worried about experiencing the sounds and vibrations of the unscrewing – how did that go? A hui hou

    • June 30, 2015
      Reply

      Thanks Don, fortunately the staff kept me distracted long enough for me not to pay attention to the actual unscrewing. It was over before I knew it.

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