Adare to Dream

It is no secret that I long to live in Ireland for some time in my life, whether it be for one year, ten years, or happily ever after. Ever since our trip over there, I have been researching ways to make that simple dream a reality. Who knew it would be such a difficult dream to make come true?

When I began doing my research I had read that American citizens could file for Irish citizenship by simply proving your great-grandparents were born in Ireland. Since my great-grandparents were born in Ireland, I thought this would be a piece of cake. So I contacted the Irish consulate in San Francisco for clarification and to get the correct paperwork to begin the process. I was informed that in order for me to obtain citizenship through birth or descent my mother would have had to have registered herself in the Foreign Births Register before I was born.

Taken directly from their website, the following table may help to explain the situation:

If you are: Then you are:
A Born in the island of Ireland on or before 31 December 2004 Entitled to Irish citizenship or you are an Irish citizen
B Born on the island of Ireland on or after 1 January 2005 Entitled to Irish citizenship if one or both of your parents:

  • Is Irish
  • Is British or entitled to live in Northern Ireland or the Irish State without restriction on their residency
  • Is a foreign national legally resident in the island of Ireland for 3 out of 4 years immediately prior to your birth
  • Has been granted refugee status in Ireland
C Child of A, born outside the island of Ireland An Irish citizen
D Child of C and a grandchild of A, born outside the island of Ireland Entitled to Irish citizenship, but you must first register in the Foreign Births Register
E a child of D and a great-grandchild of A, born outside the island of Ireland Entitled to Irish citizenship, by having your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register, but only if your parent D had registered by the time of your birth.

The only way I could obtain citizenship through birth or descent would have been option E for me in the above table.

Once I realized I would not be able to obtain dual citizenship this way, I immediately began applying for jobs in Ireland.

I applied anywhere and everywhere, trying to avoid Dublin in the beginning. I found that certain hotels close their doors during the slower winter months, so full-time employment was not a guarantee. I learned that the term concierge varies greatly in job duties from America to Ireland. Most importantly I learned that not being a citizen of the European Union was an instant strike against me when applying for jobs.

After applying to most major resorts in Ireland, I finally was given an interview via Skype with the Director of Human Resources at the Adare Manor. The resort is completely closed until September, as they are undergoing a huge renovation and enhancement process. The interview went well and afterwards we emailed back and forth about the complexities of an American citizen obtaining a work visa in Ireland. Every month or so, we would touch base and she would give me information on how the process was moving along and I was in this hopeful, but nervous state all the time, waiting for a definitive yes or no.

My dream of living and working over in Ireland came to screeching halt this morning after reading my email. After months of communication between myself and the Director of Human Resources, she informed me that the Irish Naturalization and Immigration Services will not be awarding work visas for the hospitality sector.

And with that information, a door has closed.

If you know me well, you know that I will not give up on my dream so easily. I will be looking for any and all opportunities that will afford us the ability to spend any extended amount of time over on the Emerald Isle. If anyone has any contacts within the Irish government that might be able to help, please send me their information.

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Vincent Lorusso Written by:

A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives. - Jackie Robinson

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